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Serendipity Talk: Celebrating John Williams at 90 - Shared screen with speaker view
Marian Kisch
15:57
Can’t seem to find place to make it full screen. It’s small
olli webinar
17:05
It should be as big as your Zoom window is. Can you pull on the sides of the Zoom box to enlarge it?
Paula Glauber
44:29
Can you fix the sound? Skipping
Geraldine Ostrove
44:31
My sound is going in and out. Anyone else?
Earl
44:52
yes
Susan
45:11
YEs, say here
Anita Farb
45:34
Sound is not good
Geraldine Ostrove
45:57
Now there's no sound at all.
MEI Teacher
46:21
no sound
KIM Weichel
01:04:42
Do you know to what extent that Williams developed the music on his own or did he develop it in coordination with watching the films as they progressed scene by scene?
Geraldine Ostrove
01:08:48
I often think that without French horns there couldn't be any film music. Well, sometimes maybe trumpets too, and maybe the rest of the brasses. Would you say John Williams can take any responsibility for prompting this?
Gary Arlen
01:11:50
Do you have any sense of how much Speilberg (or other directors) gave their input to the composer?
Gary Arlen
01:13:14
Did Williams do he orchestrations too?
Barbara Reioux
01:22:42
You’ve been mentioning Strauss, Mahler, the Germanic composers, but wouldn’t you include the English composers, Elgar, Walton, especially who also wrote for Olivier’s Shakespeare films. Williams’ processionals are very Elgarian — including soaring strings and triumphant brass (all the brass !!) and percussion. He obviously had studied orchestration. Also, as for the value of film music, let’s not forget the pioneering “Fantasia” which included great music that inspired many children (and adults)….(Marilyn, here)
Stuart
01:25:31
This presentation was wonderful. I look forward to your class in two weeks.
Mónica Grigera
01:26:39
Thank you!!!
Barbara Reioux
01:27:24
Thanks for that list !! It reminds us that all the great films have great film music, too !!
Susan Miller
01:42:15
Really enjoyed this. Thank you so much.